Factors Affecting Burnout in Hospital Nurses During Raising Children

  • Yuko Takayama
  • Eiko Suzuki
  • Akiko Maruyama
  • Shigeko Shibata
  • Mika Takano
  • Maki Matsuo

Abstract

Burnout is a common feature among healthcare professionals. This study investigated the factors affecting burnout of hospital nurses who were raising children with the aim of preventing burnout among them. A total of 3,758 nurses who worked at 9 city hospitals in Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, were sent the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS; Japanese version) in June 2014. The responses were divided according to their children’s ages. A data analysis was undertaken for those nurses with children who were aged under junior high school students (n = 749; Male = 74, Female = 675). It was found that there were no differences in burnout state among hospital nurses raising children according to gender. A multiple regression analysis revealed that factors related to burnout of those nurses were “Irritation at not being able to attend to personal affairs,” “Little sense of work fulfillment,” “Feeling ill-qualified as a parent,” “Length of commuting time,” “Will to continue working,” and “Amount of overtime work per week.” A burnout causal model was examined based on structural equation modeling for those nurses using the factors described by multiple regression analysis as observation variables. All factors directly affected burnout and “Irritation” and “Overtime work,” and “Irritation” and “Feeling ill-qualified as a parent” showed a weak positive correlation. Childcare occurs during a limited period and appropriate support is needed. A workplace environment with no overtime work, and mental health support to reduce “feelings of irritation” and “feeling ill-qualified as a parent” could help prevent burnout in hospital nurses raising children.

Abstract

Burnout is a common feature among healthcare professionals. This study investigated the factors affecting burnout of hospital nurses who were raising children with the aim of preventing burnout among them. A total of 3,758 nurses who worked at 9 city hospitals in Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, were sent the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS; Japanese version) in June 2014. The responses were divided according to their children’s ages. A data analysis was undertaken for those nurses with children who were aged under junior high school students (n = 749; Male = 74, Female = 675). It was found that there were no differences in burnout state among hospital nurses raising children according to gender. A multiple regression analysis revealed that factors related to burnout of those nurses were “Irritation at not being able to attend to personal affairs,” “Little sense of work fulfillment,” “Feeling ill-qualified as a parent,” “Length of commuting time,” “Will to continue working,” and “Amount of overtime work per week.” A burnout causal model was examined based on structural equation modeling for those nurses using the factors described by multiple regression analysis as observation variables. All factors directly affected burnout and “Irritation” and “Overtime work,” and “Irritation” and “Feeling ill-qualified as a parent” showed a weak positive correlation. Childcare occurs during a limited period and appropriate support is needed. A workplace environment with no overtime work, and mental health support to reduce “feelings of irritation” and “feeling ill-qualified as a parent” could help prevent burnout in hospital nurses raising children.

Published
2018-04-26
How to Cite
TAKAYAMA, Yuko et al. Factors Affecting Burnout in Hospital Nurses During Raising Children. GSTF Journal of Nursing and Health Care (JNHC), [S.l.], v. 5, n. 1, apr. 2018. ISSN 2345-7198. Available at: <http://dl6.globalstf.org/index.php/jnhc/article/view/1324>. Date accessed: 20 jan. 2019.